What is a Payday Loan?

  • Personal Loans

A payday loan is a short-term loan with a high annual percentage rate. Also known as cash advance and check advance loans, payday loans are designed to cover you until payday and there are very few issues if you repay the loan in full before the payment date. Fail to do so, however, and you could be hit with severe penalties.

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Lenders may ask the borrower to write a postdated check for the date of their next paycheck, only to hit them with rollover fees if that check bounces or they request an extension. It’s this rollover that causes so many issues for borrowers and it’s the reason there have been some huge changes in this industry over the last decade or so. 

How Do Payday Loans Work?

Payday lending seems like a simple, easy, and problem free process, but that’s what the payday lender relies on. 

The idea is quite simple. Imagine, for instance, that your car suddenly breaks down, payday is 10 days away, and you don’t have a single cent to your name. The mechanic quotes you $300 for the fix, and because you’re already drowning in debt and have already sold everything valuable, your only option is payday lending.

The payday lender offers you the $300 for a small fee. They remind you that if you repay this small short-term cash sum on payday, you won’t incur many fees or any real issues. But a lot can happen in 10 days. 

More bills can land in your mailbox, more expenses can arrive out of nowhere, and before you know it, all of your paycheck has been allocated for other expenses. The payday lender offers to rollover your loan for another month (another “payday”) and because you don’t have much choice, you agree.

But in doing so, you’ve just been hit with more high fees, more compounding interest, and a sum that just seems to keep on growing. By the time your next payday arrives, you’re only able to afford a small repayment, and from that moment on you’re locked into a debt that doesn’t seem to go anywhere.

Predatory Practices

Payday loans have been criticized for being predatory and it’s easy to see why. Banks and credit unions profit more from high-income individuals as they borrow and invest more money. A single high-income consumer can be worth more than a dozen consumers straddling the poverty line.

Payday lenders, however, target their services at low-income individuals. They offer small-dollar loans and seem to profit the most when payment dates are missed and interest rates compound, something that is infinitely more probable with low-income consumers.

Low-income consumers are also more likely to need a small cash boost every now and then and less likely to have the collateral needed for a low-interest title loan. According to official statistics, during the heyday of payday loans, most lenders were divorced renters struggling to make ends meet.

Nearly a tenth of consumers earning less than $15.000 have used payday loans, compared to fewer than 1% for those earning more than $100,000. Close to 70% of all payday loans are used for recurring expenses, such as utility bills and other debts, while 16% are used for emergency purchases.

Pros and Cons of Taking Out a Payday Loan

Regardless of what the lender or the commercial tells you, all forms of credit carry risk, and payday loans are no exception. In fact, it is one of the riskiest forms of credit available, dragging you into a cycle of debt that you may struggle to escape from. Issues aside, however, there are some benefits to these loans, and we need to look at the cons as well as the pros.

Pros: You Don’t Need Good Credit

Payday loans don’t require impeccable credit scores and many lenders won’t even check an applicant’s credit report. They can afford to do this because they charge high interest and fees, and this allows them to offset many of the costs associated with the increased liability and risk.

If you’re struggling to cover your bills and have just been hit with an unexpected expense, this can be a godsend—it’s a last resort option that could buy you some time until payday.

Pros: It’s Quick

Payday loans give you money when you need it, something that many other loans and credit offers simply can’t provide. If you need money right now, a payday lender can help; whereas another lender may require a few days to transfer that money or provide you with a suitable line of credit.

Some lenders provide 24/7 access to money, with online applications offering instant decisions and promising a money transfer within 24 hours.

Pro: They Require Very Little

A payday loan lender has a very short list of criteria for its applicants to meet. A traditional lender may request your Social Security Number, proof of ID, and a credit check, but the average payday lender will ask for none of these things.

Generally, you will be asked to prove that you are in employment, have a bank account, and are at least 18 years old—that’s it. You may also be required to submit proof that you are a US citizen.

Cons: High Risk of Defaulting

A study by the Center for Responsible Lending found that nearly half of all payday loans go into default within just 2 years. That’s a staggering statistic when you consider that the average default rate for personal loans and credit cards is between 1% and 4%.

It proves the point that many payday lender critics have been making for years: Payday loans are predatory and high-risk. The average credit or loan account is only provided after the applicant has undergone a strict underwriting process. The lender takes its time to check that the applicant is suitable, looking at their credit history, credit score, and more, and only giving them the credit/loan when they are confident it will be repaid.

This may seem like an unnecessary and frustrating process, but as the above statistics prove, it’s not just for the benefit of the lender as it also protects the consumer from a disastrous default.

Con: High Fees

High interest rates aren’t the only reason payday lenders are considered predatory. Like all lenders, they charge fees for late payments. But unlike other lenders, these fees are astronomical and if you’re late by several weeks or months, those fees can be worth more than the initial balance.

A few years ago, a survey on payday lending discovered that the average borrower had accumulated $458 worth of fees, even though the median loan was nearly half that amount.

Cons: There are Better Options

If you have a respectable credit history or any kind of collateral, there are better options available. A bank or credit union can provide you with small short-term loans you can repay over many months without accumulating astronomical sums of interest. 

The interest rates are much lower, the fees are more manageable, and unless your credit score is really poor, you should be offered more favorable terms than what you can get from a payday lender.

Even a credit card can offer you better terms. Generally speaking, a credit card has some of the highest interest rates of any unsecured debt, but it can’t compare to a payday loan. It also has very little impact on your credit score and many credit card providers offer 0% on purchases for the first-few months.

What’s more, if things go wrong with a credit card, you have more options than you have with a payday loan, including a balance transfer credit card or a debt settlement program.

Why Do Payday Loans Charge So Much Interest?

If we were to take a cynical view, we could say that payday loans charge a lot simply because the lender can get away with charging a lot. After all, a payday loan lender targets the lowest-income individuals, the ones who need money the most and find themselves in desperate situations.

However, this doesn’t paint a complete picture. In actual fact, it all comes down to risk and reward. A lender increases its interest rate when an applicant is at a greater risk of default. 

The reason you can get low rates when you have a great credit score and high rates when you don’t, is because the former group is more likely to pay on time and in full, whereas the latter group is more likely to default.

Lending is all about balancing the probabilities, and because a short-term loan is at serious risk of defaulting, the costs are very high.

Payday Loans and Your Credit Score

Your credit will only be affected if the lender reports to the credit bureaus. This is something that many consumers overlook, incorrectly assuming that every payment will result in a positive report and every missed payment in a negative one. 

If the lender doesn’t report to the main credit bureaus, there will be no changes to your report and the account will not even show. This is how many payday lenders operate. They rarely run credit checks, so your report won’t be hit with an inquiry, and they tend not to report on-time payments.

However, it’s a different story if you miss those payments. A lender can report missed payments and defaults and may also sell your account to a debt collector, at which point your credit score will take a hit. 

If you’re concerned about how an application will impact your credit score, speak with the lender or read the terms and conditions before applying. And remember to always meet your payments on time to avoid any negative marks on your credit report and, more importantly, to ensure you’re not hit with additional fees.

Payday Loans vs Personal Loans

A personal loan is generally a much better option than a payday loan. These loans are designed to help you cover emergency expenses, pay for home improvements, launch businesses, and, in the case of debt consolidation loans, to clear your debt. 

The interest rates are around 6% to 10% for lenders with respectable credit scores, and while they often charge an origination fee and late fees, they are generally much cheaper options. You can repay the loan at a time that suits you and tailor the payments to fit your monthly expenses, ensuring that they don’t leave you short at the end of the month.

You can get a personal loan from a bank or a credit union; whenever you need the money, just compare, apply, and then wait for it to hit your account. The money paid by these loans is generally much higher than that offered by payday loans and you can stretch it out over a few years if needed.

What is an Unsecured Loan?

Personal and payday loans are both classed as unsecured loans, as the lender doesn’t secure them against money or assets. Secured loans are typically secured against your home (mortgage, home equity loan) or your car (auto loan, title loan). They can also be secured against a cash deposit, as is the case with secured credit cards.

Although this may seem like a negative, considering a lender can repossess your asset if you fail to meet the payment terms, it actually provides many positives. For instance, a secured loan gives the lender more recourse if anything goes wrong, which means the underwriters don’t need to account for a lot of risk. As a result, the lender is more likely to offer you a low interest rate. 

Where cash advance loans and other small loans are concerned, there is generally no option for securing the loan. The lender won’t be interested, and neither should you—what’s the point of securing a $30,000 car against a $1,000 loan!?

New Payday Loan Regulations

Payday lenders are subject to very strict rules and regulations and this industry has undergone some serious changes in recent years. In some states, limits are imposed to prevent high interest rates; in others, payday lenders are banned from operating altogether. 

The golden age of payday lending has passed, there’s no doubt about that. In fact, many lenders left the US markets and took their business to countries like the UK, only for the UK authorities to impose many of the same restrictions after a few years of pandemonium. In the US, the industry thrived during the end of the 2000s and the beginning of the 2010s, but it has since been losing ground and the practice is illegal or highly restricted in many states.

Are Payday Loans Still Legal?

Payday loans are legal in 27 states, but many states have imposed strict rules and regulations governing everything from loan amounts to fees. The states where payday lenders are not allowed to operate are:

  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • Connecticut
  • Georgia
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Pennsylvania
  • Vermont
  • West Virginia

It is still possible to apply for personal loans and title loans in these states, but high-interest, cash advance loans are out of the question, for the time being at least.

Debt Rollover Rules for Payday Lenders

One of the things that regulations cover is something known as Debt Rollover, whereby a consumer rolls their debt over into the next billing period, accruing fees and continuing to pay interest. The more rollovers there are, the greater the risk and the higher the detriment to the borrower.

Debt rollovers are at fault for many of the issues concerning payday loans. They create a cycle of persistent debt, as the borrower is forced to acquire additional debt to repay the payday loan debt. 

In the following states, payday loans are legal but restricted to between 0 and 1 rollovers:

  • Alabama
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • Washington D.C.
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Other states tend to limit debt rollovers to 2, but there are some notable exceptions. In South Dakota and Delaware, as many as 4 are allowed, while the state of Missouri allows for 6. However, the borrower must reduce the principal of the loan by at least 5% during each successive rollover.

Are These Changes for the Best?

If you’re a payday lender, the aforementioned rules and regulations are definitely not a good thing. Payday lenders rely on persistent debt. They make money from the poorest percentage of the population as they are the ones most likely to get trapped in that cycle.

For responsible borrowers, however, they turn something potentially disastrous into something that could serve a purpose. Payday loans still carry a huge risk, especially if there is any chance that you won’t repay the loan in time, but the limits imposed on interest rates and rollovers reduces the astronomical costs.

In that sense, they are definitely for the best, but there are still risks and potential pitfalls, so be sure to keep these in mind before you apply for any short-term loans.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

How to Get a Personal Loan (Application, Approval, Alternatives)

  • Personal Loans

Personal loans are typically unsecured loans offering up to $50,000 with a term of up to 5 years. They come in several shapes and sizes and interest rates, fees, and terms can differ greatly, but the average personal loan in the United States is between $7,000 and $8,000 and charged at a rate of 11% and 12%.

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Steps to Getting a Personal Loan

  1. Check Your Credit Report
  2. Compare Rates and Terms
  3. Get a Pre-Qualification
  4. Look at the Fine Print
  5. Look at Alternative Options
  6. Receive Final Approval

1. Check Your Credit Report

The better your credit score is, the lower the interest rate of the loan will be. You can get a free credit check from all three of the main credit bureaus (TransUnion, Experian, Equifax) once a year and use this to see what the lenders will see.

Your credit report will show your credit history in intricate detail, as well as your personal details and all active accounts. If your credit score is below 600, you’ll likely be refused a personal loan; if it’s lower than 700, you may succeed, but won’t necessarily get the best rate.

In any case, it always helps to build your credit score and it’s also very easy to do. If you follow the steps below, you may see a sizeable improvement in a few short months:

  • Increase Credit Limits: Your credit utilization ratio calculates your debt in relation to your credit limits. Someone with a debt of $100,000 is not necessarily worse off than someone with debt of $10,000 if the former has a credit limit of $2 million and the latter has a credit limit of $20,000. By judging debt in this way, your credit score builds an accurate and relative picture of your financial situation. By increasing your credit limits, you can improve this part of your credit score in one quick move.
  • Payoff Debt: Debt is the other half of the credit utilization ratio and works just as well as increasing your credit limit. If you have a debt of $5,000 and a credit limit of $10,000, your credit utilization is a high 50%. If you repay just $1,000 and increase your credit limit by $1,000, this ratio drops to a respectable 36%.
  • Get a Secured Credit Card: A secured credit card uses a security deposit as collateral, allowing you to sign-up even if you have very bad credit or no credit at all. It can build your credit in as little as 6 months as all payments are reported to the credit bureaus. Your deposit will set your credit limit and is completely refundable.
  • Stop Applying: Every time you apply for a new auto loan, personal loan, credit card or mortgage, you receive a hard credit inquiry, which can reduce your FICO credit score by between 2 and 5 points. What’s more, every new account will reduce your score even more and make it harder to quickly build a strong score. Keep applications to a minimum and only apply when you absolutely need a new account.
  • Keep Making Payments: Your payment history accounts for 35% of your FICO credit score, which is more than anything else. It takes a long time to build your score this way, but as soon as you miss a payment, your score can drop by over 100 points and undo all your hard work, while making your task considerably harder.

At the same time, however, your credit score is not the only thing that matters. There is a misconception here, one that claims you can get pretty much anything you want as long as you have an excellent credit card. But that’s simply not the case.

If you are self-employed with an inconsistent income that never goes higher than $15,000 a year, it’s still possible to have an excellent credit score. After all, as long as you keep credit applications to a minimum, meet your payment obligations on time and keep a strong credit utilization ratio, you can build a great credit score.

But does that mean you’ll be offered a $200,000 mortgage or a $50,000 personal loan? Of course not. You’re not making enough money to cover those debts. You might be offered a low limit credit card with relative ease, but you’ll struggle to get a sizeable personal loan and may be refused outright.

2. Compare Rates and Terms

An estimated rate is, as the name suggests, just an estimate. It can vary greatly depending on your credit score, income, and a few other factors. However, your eventual rate will always fall into the estimated range and by looking for the best ranges and comparing the most likely rate based on your current credit score, you can avoid wasting your time on high interest loans.

Many borrowers will look for the lender they are most familiar with, including the ones they have a bank account or mortgage with. But your checking account is irrelevant here and by skipping the comparison shopping you could end up with a much higher rate than you can afford.

Look for the cheapest rates and compare these to the best loan amounts. Calculate how much you will need and whether or not you can sacrifice a few dollars here and there to save more on interest. 

3. Get a Pre-Qualification

A pre-qualification will give you an idea of what sort of loan you can get based on your credit score and income. You can then use this information to compare and contrast, ensuring you find the best and most suitable loan for you.

You will need to supply all of the following information, and this will be used to determine if you’re a good fit or not:

  • Your Social Security Number
  • Your full income and debts (debt-to-income ratio)
  • Your date of birth, home address, phone number, and email
  • All your previous addresses dating back a fixed number of years
  • Details of your education

If your income is too low, your debt-to-income ratio is too high, your credit score is poor or you have made too many credit applications, you may be refused a pre-qualification.

4. Look at the Fine Print

Does the loan have a prepayment penalty? Does it charge high fees and penalty rates? Is there an origination fee? This information may not be included on the main offer page, but it’s essential for determining the worth of a loan, so dig around in the terms and conditions, and make sure you’re getting the best loan possible in terms of the lowest rate as well as the lowest fees.

5. Look at Alternative Options

A personal loan is not the only option at your disposal, and it may not even be the best one. Depending on what you need the money for, there are a host of better alternatives out there, ones that may be more forgiving of your credit score and more willing to give you a large sum and a low rate.

It’s not all about banks. There are online lenders, credit unions, and a host of other financial institutions willing to help you out.

We have outlined some of the best alternative options a little further down this article.

6. Receive Final Approval

Once you have browsed multiple loan offers, checked loan rates, and decided on the best option for you, it’s time to apply and get final approval. You will need to provide some additional info, including W-2 forms and pay stubs, and then the lender will check your credit score and you’ll receive a hit of between 2 and 5 points.

If there are no issues, the loan will be finalized. Some online lenders offer to pay your funds by the next business day and other lenders offer instant payment on acceptance of the loan application. However, many will pay within 1 week.

What are Personal Loans Used For?

You can use a personal loan for a variety of reasons and in most cases, the lender doesn’t care which one you choose. As long as you meet the monthly payments and have a respectable credit score, they don’t care if you’re blowing it on a vacation or launching a business. Here are a few reasons to apply for a personal loan, some of which make more sense than others.

Debt Consolidation

If you have a lot of credit card debt, you can use an unsecured personal loan to clear it. You’ll still have debt, as you’re essentially swapping one debt for another, but you may be charged a lower interest rate or smaller monthly payment.

There are debt consolidation and debt management companies that specialize in this service and can do all the hard work for you. However, these companies focus mainly on reducing your monthly payment and interest rate in exchange for a prolonged-term. You’ll pay less per month and may have an APR that is several points lower, but the increased term means you will pay much more over the length of the loan.

If you have a strong credit score, are in a good financial position and have several high interest credit card debts, you can get a low rate, short-term loan. You’ll pay more per month, but over the term, you could save thousands of dollars in interest payments.

Vacation

It’s rarely a good idea to accumulate debt just so you can enjoy the vacation of a lifetime. But what if it’s the only chance you have of taking that vacation? What if it would be a life goal realized and you’re confident that you can make the monthly payments and eventually clear the debt?

In such cases, while we would never recommend it, using a personal loan for a vacation is understandable. It’s something that many older married couples do to pay for cruises and trips across Europe. It’s also a method used by young married couples to have the honeymoon they have always dreamed of.

College Education

Student loans aren’t always readily available, nor are they the best option. And while they are usually more preferable to personal loans, they may not provide the coverage that you or your grandchildren need.

In the last decade or so, there has been an over 1,000% increase in the number of senior student loan borrowers. This isn’t the result of an influx of mature learners, but rather it’s because they are assuming debts on behalf of their grandchildren and children, co-signing to help them through college.

Pay for a Major Expense

Life can throw several major and unexpected expenses your way, and if you don’t have any money in your savings, a personal loan may be your only option. Many couples live their lives relatively debt and problem-free until one of the following expenses raises its head and they opt for a personal loan.

  • Marriage: A marriage is not something that happens unexpectedly, unless you’re a parent and your child is the one getting married. In either case, it’s a massive expense that can cripple you financially, with the average wedding costing over $30,000.
  • Adoption: The average cost of adoption in the United States ranges from between $40,000 and $50,000. Like a wedding, it’s not necessarily something that happens unexpectedly, but also like a wedding, when the time is right and the need is there, it’s something you feel like you have to do.
  • Funeral: Funerals can cost upwards of $10,000 and often occur out of the blue. If the deceased is insured or has assets, it’s not a problem, but there are countless people who are not insured, don’t have assets, and die unexpectedly. If you’re the closest person to them, you may find yourself assuming responsibility for their funeral.
  • Medical Services: If you fall ill and need a specific type of treatment or surgery that your insurance won’t cover, a personal loan could be the only option. Medical treatments are very expensive, and many Americans simply can’t afford to cover these costs out of their own pockets.

Launch a Business

Launching a business is another risky way to use a personal loan, but one that many borrowers are submitting to every year. This is the golden age of entrepreneurs, and there has never been a better time to launch a business.

Of course, grants and business loans are also available, but the former often requires you to work in specific niches and abide by specific terms, while the latter will be weighed against your personal finances if your business is small or new. A personal loan, therefore, may be the only option for business owners seeking to launch a new project.

Alternative Options to Personal Loans

A personal loan isn’t your only option when you need a little cash. You can borrow money through several different avenues, and the best option for you will depend on what you’re using the money for:

Credit Building

You need credit to build credit; you need a credit card or a loan before you can get the FICO score you need to get a credit card or a loan. It can feel like a Catch-22 situation, but it’s not as complicated as it might initially appear.

If you have no credit or bad credit, you may be offered a super high interest rate loan or credit card and that can help you to build a respectable score. However, it’s a risky way to do it and there are many better options out there if your only goal is to build credit.

For loans, you can use something known as a credit builder loan. Much like a reverse loan, a credit builder loan requires you to complete many of the same steps as a traditional loan, only the lender keeps the lump sum amount and moves it to a secured account. 

That loan payment earns you a small rate of interest and this helps to offset some of the interest you pay the lender. Every month, you make a payment on the loan, paying some of the principal in addition to the monthly interest, and the lender will report your payments to the three major credit bureaus (TransUnion, Experian, Equifax).

Every month, your score will improve slightly as your payment history receives a boost and then, at the end of the term, they’ll release the lump sum to you, and you’ll get most of your money back (minus the interest) in addition to the credit score boost.

Paying Off Debt

A personal loan is a great way to clear debt, but it’s not necessarily the best option. If you’re struggling to meet your monthly payment obligations, it’s not the right option at all, as your monthly payments will increase as your term decreases.

Instead, you can look into the following options:

  • Debt Payoff: Sometimes, simple debt payoff strategies like the Debt Avalanche and the Debt Snowball are enough to clear your debt and can do so in a way that won’t cost you dearly or damage your credit score.
  • Debt Settlement: One of the best and cheapest ways to clear credit card debts, debt settlement works by agreeing reduced settlement amounts with your creditors.
  • Debt Management: A form of debt consolidation performed by a specialist credit counselor. You will pay less every month and can receive greatly improved terms.

Launching a Business

Once you’ve cut costs, reduced expenses, and considered all possible ways to reduce your initial outlay for a business launch, then it might be time to consider crowdfunding. Sites like Kickstarter can help you to get the funds you need and if you have a good idea or product, along with perks, it can give you capital.

You can also sell shares in your business to friends and family, or simply ask them for a small loan.

Expanding a Business

One of the best loan options for expanding your business is something known as PayPal Working Capital, a program that we have touched upon and praised several times before. If you accept PayPal for your business and have processed many payments through your PayPal account, you’ll be offered a lump sum to help you grow.

The loan amount you’re offered will depend on how much money you receive every month. As for the repayment term, you need to pay 10% of the total every 90 days, and all payments are taken as a percentage of your income. If you opt for $20,000, you may pay a fee of $2,000, taking the total to $22,000, and be asked to pay $2,200 every 90 days for a 20% cut.

This means that for every $1,000 you earn, you’ll pay $200 back to your PayPal Working Capital loan, in addition to the usual PayPal fees. The application process is quick and easy, and you can have the money in your PayPal account in just a few minutes.

Paying for Education

While a personal loan can be a useful option when paying for your education or a family member’s education, student loans often provide better rates and loan terms. They can also cover most of the costs associated with college, although if you need extra money for living costs, then a personal loan can be considered.

Paying for Vacations or Other Expenses

If you are a homeowner and have built substantial equity in your home, then a home equity loan or home equity line of credit may provide you with better loan terms and a much higher loan amount. 

A home equity loan or line of credit is a secured loan, as it uses your home as collateral. If you fail to make the payments every month and eventually default on your loan, the lender can simply take your asset and use it to recover the costs of the loan. 

As a result, the annual percentage rate is often much lower. You will still need good credit and a respectable debt-to-income ratio to apply, but the best home equity loan is typically much more favorable and cheaper than the best personal loan.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Personal Loans After Bankruptcy

  • Personal Loans

Bankruptcy is not the end of the world. In fact, while it is more difficult to acquire loans and credit cards, it’s not impossible. In this guide, we’ll show you how you can get short-term loans and long-term loans even after you have filed for bankruptcy.

Get approved fast for a Personal Loan!

Compare multiple loan options from the nation’s top lenders.

Attention: Still Open During the Financial Crisis…

Tip: Apply now to see if you qualify for a personal loan today!

Whether you have debt to repay, bills to cover or credit to build, you can get back on track with a personal loan, even if you have recently filed for bankruptcy.

Challenges in Getting a Personal Loan After Bankruptcy

You will face a few issues when applying for an unsecured personal loan after bankruptcy. Firstly, lenders will insist that you wait a while before you apply. The exact timeframe will depend on the individual lender and the type of loan, but generally, you’ll need to give it at least 2 years.

Your credit score is also important. Bankruptcy can reduce your credit score by over 200 points, and it can do all kinds of major damage before you file. Loan companies are not interested in lending to individuals with poor credit scores and recent bankruptcy filings. This is especially true if they filed for Chapter 7, in which case all debts were discharged.

It makes sense—creditors base their activity on statistics and probability. If you have a recent filing and a terrible credit score, statistically you’re much less likely to meet your monthly repayments.

Some lenders will be more willing to take a risk on the basis that an individual who has recently filed is unable to file again for another few years. However, in these cases, they are still taking a massive risk and to offset that they will offer you massive rates. 

What’s more, while it seems like they are doing you a favor by taking a chance when no one else will, they’re actually just taking advantage of your desperation, offering you an unsecured loan when you’re more willing to accept.

Most Common Challenges and How to Overcome

The biggest issue you have when applying for personal loans after bankruptcy concerns your credit score. Your score will likely be very low, and many lenders refuse to offer low-rate loans to consumers with scores less than 660. If you have a score of 550 or less, you may still be offered a loan, but the rates will be high.

The good news is that things get easier with time. A bankruptcy discharge essentially wipes your slate clean, eliminating your monthly payments. This leaves you with more money in your pocket, which means you should have less need for an unsecured personal loan.

If you need a car, try a car loan instead. The fact that it is secured against the vehicle should ensure you receive better rates, even with a low credit score. If you simply need to build your credit score, try a secured credit card instead. Providing you meet your monthly payments on this secured card, you’ll get your security deposit back and your credit score will improve, as lenders report all activity to the credit bureaus. 

How Bankruptcy Affects Your Ability to Get a Personal Loan

A bankruptcy can remain on your credit report for 10 years and do some serious damage to your credit score in that time. The effects will diminish with each passing year and in the final few years, you shouldn’t have any issues whatsoever. However, it will take a few years before your credit score improves to a point where you don’t need to limit yourself to high-rate loans.

Your credit score isn’t the only issue, either. Many home, car, and personal loan lenders refuse all applicants who have filed for bankruptcy within a fixed period of time, often between 2 and 3 years. If you need a loan during this time then your options are limited, to say the least. You will be forced to choose one of the following options for unsecured credit:

  • Bad Credit Car Loans: These loans offer respectable sums and terms, but they have high-interest rates, and these may increase if you don’t meet your monthly payment obligations.
  • Payday Loans: High-rate and low-limit loans offered over a short period. The idea is that you take the loan when you’re struggling to make ends meet and need some assistance before payday. These loans are not as bad as they once were due to restrictions and regulations, but they are still not ideal. They are also illegal in nearly half of all US states.
  • Unsecured Credit Cards: You can also get a revolving line of credit with an unsecured credit card. However, as with bad credit loans, these have high-interest rates and very poor terms.

To trick you into paying a higher APR, lenders won’t always advertise their rates and will instead charge a fixed sum every month. This can be the equivalent of an APR over 20%, much higher than the average, which is around 16%.

Best Installment Loans After Bankruptcy

Before applying for a personal loan, take a close look at your finances. Calculate your debt-to-income ratio, and make sure you can comfortably afford the payments. If you have recently filed for bankruptcy, you can’t apply again for several years which means you’ve lost your get-out clause and can’t afford to fall behind on your payments.

If you struggle to meet your payments, lenders may still offer a repayment plan and financial hardship programs. However, if you’ve already been through debt issues then your options decrease and they may be less willing to lend a helping hand.

Only when you’re absolutely confident in your financial situation and your ability to repay should you seek to acquire additional debt. 

Here are a few providers and options that can help:

  • Upstart: Accepts credit scores as low as 580 with APRs as high as 36%.
  • Lending Club: You need a credit score of at least 600 to apply.
  • OneMain Financial: There is no minimum credit score and monthly payments begin at just over $200.
  • Lending Point: A minimum credit score of 585 is needed for loans of between $2,000 and $30,000.
  • Avant: Get up to $35,000 with an APR ranging from around 10% to 36%.

What Happens if you Get Refused?

If you get refused for a personal loan because you have a poor credit card or have recently filed for bankruptcy, there are a few options:

Wait

Patience is the best policy in this situation. It doesn’t matter how bleak things seem right now, they will improve in time. The longer you wait, the older your accounts will become, the more your payment history will improve (assuming you have active accounts) and the further away that bankruptcy filing will be.

If you don’t have any active accounts, waiting can still help, but you should also look into acquiring a credit card with a security deposit, which can greatly improve your credit score in just a few months 

A credit builder loan can also help, as can lending circles. These options are easy to apply for and don’t require stringent checks, great credit or a clean bankruptcy history. But before you get excited, they don’t give you cash sums in advance and are designed purely to help you rebuild your credit.

Appeal to the Lender

Bigger lenders use a long list of criteria to determine which applicants to accept and which ones to reject. No amount of begging or explaining will change their minds and if you’re rejected, you just need to move on, improve your score, and try again in the future.

However, if a smaller lender rejects you because of your recent bankruptcy filing, it’s worth contacting them to explain your situation. Explain how you have turned things around, show them proof if you have it, and ask them what would be required of you for them to accept. You might not get them to change their minds, but it should give you some valuable insight into their process.

Look for a Co-signer

A co-signer with a strong credit history can back you for a personal loan. However, it’s a very sensitive area and a huge favor to ask of anyone, even someone who loves you. 

If you stop meeting those payments the co-signer will become responsible for them, putting their credit in jeopardy. Choose carefully, don’t place anyone in an awkward position, never assume they should help you just because you need help, and always make your monthly payments so they are never required to cover for you.

Seek Other Options

There are other creditors, other loans, and other options—try a credit card, borrow from a friend or family member, sell an asset, use a pawn shop. We live in a credit hungry society and there are more options than anywhere else. Use these to your advantage and don’t get stuck chasing the same loan.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com