Must Have Tools for Thanksgiving Dinner Prep This Year

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Tools for cooking Thanksgiving Dinner | Thanksgiving dinner | Kitchen tools

We don’t have to tell you that Thanksgiving looks and feels a lot different this year.  This may be the first you you are cooking the big meal yourself.  While we wish we could be there to help, the next best thing is to share with you our favorite tools for prepping a Thanksgiving feast.  And once you’ve got all the tools ordered, be sure to check out our Pinterest boards, for all of our favorite recipes both for Thanksgiving dinner and for the accompanying drinks.

fat separator–ALL THE GRAVY-NONE OF THE GREASE

BRINING=ACING THE TURKEY GAME

SAVE STOVETOP SPACE -SLOW COOK YOUR MASHED POTATOES

BECAUSE YOU’RE PROBABLY NOT EATING THAT WHOLE PIE IN ONE SITTING…BUT WE WON’T JUDGE IF YOU DO

GET THE RIGHT TEMP

Ready to find your next apartment?

BASTE LIKE A PRO

BECAUSE MANHANDLING A HOT TURKEY IS NOT A GOOD LOOK

Stainless Steel Trash & Recycling Center

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Must Have Tools for Thanksgiving Dinner
Article Name
Must Have Tools for Thanksgiving Dinner
Description
Cooking Thanksgiving Dinner for yourself this year? These tools will help you prep Thanksgiving dinner like a pro.
Holli Beckman
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Apartminty
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Source: blog.apartminty.com

How to Negotiate Rent | ApartmentSearch

Two women talking over a computer“Everything’s negotiable,” we’re always told. But is it true? For example, can you negotiate rent with a property management company or landlord?

If current rent prices have you worriedly checking the balance in your bank account, rest easy. There are indeed steps you can take to make sure affordable apartments remain a part of your future.

1. Be a Good Tenant

You catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Being a pleasant tenant helps you approach a rent negotiation with goodwill on your side. Property management is a business, and every business appreciates attracting and retaining great customers.

A tenant who adheres to the lease agreement and is also considerate of other renters — not playing loud music late into the night, for example, or hogging the laundry room — is a great customer that any landlord would want to keep.

An outstanding record as a good tenant is especially appealing to private landlords. For them, renting space out is not so much a vocation as it is a means to make some additional revenue.

2. Do Your Homework

Data is your friend. The more information you have about the apartment rental market in the area, the better. Your goal should be to demonstrate discrepancies between the rent you pay and lower rent, for comparable space, at similar units around town.

Fortunately, there are great online resources to find different rent prices. Expand your data gathering efforts beyond just the rental price, as well. Do other apartments offer amenities your current place does not? If so, be sure to highlight those differences during your pitch.

3. Do It In Person

If at all possible, open negotiations with a face-to-face conversation. Doing so ensures you receive the attention you deserve (it’s easy to ignore an email), underscores your sincerity, and allows you to expound on data points in a way that an email attachment simply cannot.

An email and any attachments can come as part of a follow-up to your in-person meeting.

Your follow-up message may look like this:

[Put Your Landlord’s Name Here],

Thank you for taking the time to speak with me yesterday about potentially reducing my rent at [put your address here]. Such a rate reduction will help me continue being a tenant here. That alleviates any time or effort you must take to find a replacement.

A rent reduction makes sense, since [repeat your data-backed reasons here].

I look forward to hearing from you!

[Put your name here]

4. Sweeten the “Ask”

Knowing how to negotiate rent also means understanding what you can offer your landlord or property manager in addition to retaining you as a tenant. Here are some suggestions as to what you may be able to provide as part of your rent reduction negotiation:

  • A lease extension, ensuring your landlord they’ll have a great tenant for a while longer.
  • A temporary, rather than permanent, reduction in rent. Reducing your rent for even just six months is a lot better than lowering your rent for zero months.
  • A couple of months prepayment at the reduced rate.

5. Know When To Walk Away

It’s one of the principal rules of the Kenny Rogers classic, “The Gambler.” Right up there with knowing when to hold ‘em and when to fold ‘em, you have to know when to walk away.

Remember the research you did on “apartments for rent near me” as part of your negotiation pitch? Other apartments that seemed so promising in theory may well be worth a closer look in practice.

The Fastest Search is ApartmentSearch

Is your landlord not down to haggle? Find affordable apartments near you with ApartmentSearch — where you can filter places by rent price, amenities, and more!

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

10 Things to Know About Living in Las Vegas

When we think of Las Vegas, it often has a connotation of big parties, gambling and expensive fun. Most people who go to the Entertainment Capital of the World are there for a good time and want to experience the food, shows and casinos. But what’s it like for the locals who are working and living in Las Vegas?

It’s a fairly big city, and residents have access to all of the fun and excitement as other out-of-town visitors. But every day isn’t a party when you’re living there — people have homes, families and careers to think about.

There are lots of surprising aspects of living in Sin City, and it just might be the kind of scene you’re looking for.

1. Get ready for discounts

In the Entertainment Capital of the World, many hotels, casinos and even restaurants give discounts to those who live locally. That means you’ll get discounts on Las Vegas attractions, spas and even shows, such as Cirque du Soleil, so you can enjoy the perks of the city without draining your bank account.

2. There are lots of pools — and you’ll be grateful for them

poolpool

Since it can get pretty hot and be fairly warm for eight or nine months out of the year, many residents in Las Vegas have pools. Most apartment complexes have pools, but if yours doesn’t have one, you’ll inevitably have friends with access to a pool. Or, you can head to one of the hotels with a luxury pool for a little weekend staycation.

Whatever pools you can access, you’ll be glad you have them. There are plenty of days when it’s too hot to do much else outdoors and slipping into the cool water might be the only thing that keeps you sane.

3. The heat is extreme

Most people haven’t experienced Vegas-style heat — we’re talking 120 degrees Fahrenheit or more on some days during the summer. That might sound bearable when you can hang out in the pool all day, but at temperatures climb that high, even a pool will feel like a hot tub.

When it gets unbearably hot, you can plan on hanging out inside with the air conditioner cranked up and eating popsicles all day long to stay cool.

4. Grocery stores are extra convenient

Being known as one of the cities that never sleeps, most Las Vegas grocery and convenience stores are open 24/7, so you can head out and get what you need without checking the time and worrying that stores will be closed. Plus, wine, beer and spirits are sold in the majority of grocery stores.

5. It’s surprisingly affordable

Most larger, well-known cities are quite expensive when you take housing, transportation and food into account. But living in Las Vegas is surprisingly affordable — it’s actually one of the most inexpensive places to live in Nevada. The cost of living in most categories is quite close to the national average, which is surprising for a larger city.

It has a thriving housing market, where there are plenty of homes available for fairly reasonable prices, and rent isn’t sky-high. The average rent in 2020 for a one-bedroom apartment is a little more than $1,200 a month — well below the national average of $1,600. And because there are plenty of quiet suburbs outside of the Strip and downtown areas, there are lots of supermarkets, restaurants and shopping malls readily available.

Most of the expensive places, whether they’re high-end stores or five-star restaurants, are located on the Strip or in downtown Vegas. Outside of that, most stores and restaurants in the valley are affordable and easily accessible to the locals.

You’ll rarely have to pay for parking, which is uncommon in a big city. Since hotels often have stores and attractions within them and casinos want people to come inside and play, they often will have free parking garages to attract potential customers.

6. There’s unique outdoor recreation

valley of firevalley of fire

Las Vegas isn’t usually known for its camping and hiking scene, but there are some fun and different places to explore in the area. Some of the best spots are Valley of Fire and Red Rock Canyon. You can even go skiing during the winter months at Mt. Charleston, which is a reasonably short drive from the city.

And if that’s not enough for you, you’ll only be a few hours away from the state and national parks of Utah and California.

7. It’s best to have a car

In many bigger cities, there’s great public transportation, and it’s often preferred by the locals because of high parking costs and traffic congestion. But most Las Vegas residents don’t rely on public transportation to get around, and many people own cars.

Although there’s some public transportation, it’s mostly buses — the city is quite sprawling, making public transportation an extremely time-consuming option, especially if you’re going from one end to the other.

As far as driving goes, the most traffic-heavy places in the city are downtown and the Strip, and most other places aren’t too bad. Just beware of the Spaghetti Bowl, which is where multiple freeways merge together near downtown — traffic can get pretty congested there during rush hour.

8. No more state income tax

Unless you’re moving to Las Vegas from one of the other few states that doesn’t have an income tax, this will be a happy surprise. Nevada doesn’t have a personal income tax or corporate income tax.

9. Major league sports are coming in hot

In just the last few years, Sin City has become home to two major-league sports teams. The Raiders football team relocated there from Oakland earlier this year, giving residents something to be happy about, despite the other events of 2020.

But perhaps the most exciting thing was the creation of the Golden Knights, an NHL team that now plays in Vegas. When the team was first created, many people had low expectations — but the team ended up getting within only a few games of winning the Stanley Cup in its very first season. So, even if you’re not a hockey fan now, you’ll definitely become one when you move to Vegas.

10. Watch out for desert critters

scorpionscorpion

Most of us have had spiders or ants get in the house — that’s going to happen no matter where you live in the U.S. But have you dealt with cockroaches, lizards and scorpions?

While scorpions aren’t an everyday thing, you should still be aware of them and know that they could show up in your yard. And although most of the lizards are harmless, it can still be unsettling to see them basking in the sun all over the rocks around your home. But the cockroaches are something else. You’ll want to invest in good pest control because they’ll find a way to sneak into your bathroom and kitchen, even if you live on the fifth floor of a building.

If you have a pet, keep in mind that their food will attract more roaches, so keep their bowl in a high-traffic area of your house to ward off the pesky little critters. And make sure you seal the excess food in a container or bag so you don’t reach in and scoop up a handful of cockroaches when your pet is hungry.

Living in Las Vegas is full of surprises

In spite of its nickname being “Sin City,” living in Las Vegas can be a great experience. It’s a diverse place and contains all of the perks of a big city without the cost and without feeling like such a busy, overcrowded place all the time. The longer you live in Vegas, the more the city will surprise you.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Property Spotlight of the Day-Crescent Park

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The Best Apartment Deals In DC Right Now | Cheap DC Apartments

We’re all about scoring a good deal here at Apartminty.  While we love perusing the top-of-the-line luxury apartments in DC, we also understand, sometimes an affordable rent is the better option. Either way, instead of you searching for Washington, DC apartments on Craigslist and property management company listing sites, we are delivering our choice of the best apartments to rent in DC right now.  Here’s our pick for the best Washington, DC apartment in Columbia Heights for rent today. Want more information on moving to DC? Check out Apartminty’s  Ultimate Guide to Moving to Washington, DC.

Crescent Park Apartments 

2 Elmira Street SE
Washington, DC 20032

1 Bedroom/1 Bath
$1115/month
Unit #: 3
710 Sq Ft
Available Now

Why it’s a great deal:
If you are looking for a true rental deal, Crescent Park is a dream.  Located right off of South Capitol Street, these spacious apartments come equipped with hardwood floors, updated kitchens, and free basic cable. With on-site maintenance and management teams, on-site laundry facilities, and the ability to pay your rent online! Looking for something a little different? Check out Apartminty’s guide How to Find an Apartment in DC.

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Source: blog.apartminty.com

A Cozy New Rug Collection

Hello friends! Praise be, the election is over and I just marked my birthday over the weekend – my official holiday season milestone. Whenever the calendar passes November 8, I feel like I can finally turn 100% of my attention to all things holiday. Obviously, the holidays are going to look and feel very different than years past. Perhaps instead of the holiday season, we should start referring to the next few months as the hunker down season. Because that’s what holidays in the time of Covid are going to require of us. But I’m not entirely mad about the idea of holing up at home. I’ll take a very valid excuse to look for ways to make my home as cozy, comforting, and beautiful as possible.

Enter the new rug collection from Beni Rugs, designed by my style soul twin, Colin King.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

Called the Shape of Color, this new rug collection offers eleven Moroccan style rugs. Each rug features shocks of color inspired by Tangier and Marrakech. The hues are deeply saturated in simple geometric shapes or big bold stripes.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

While I typically eschew color, rugs are a wonderful spot to inject something fresh into a room. I used a bold colored rug in my own living room. The particularly nice thing about a rug – it’s an easy way to reenergize a space without really having to change anything else.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34 A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34 A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

There are a few secrets to picking out a rug. First, you want to think about size. A common mistake is getting a rug that is too small. You want all (or nearly all) your furniture in a space to sit on your rug. That helps a room feel anchored and like everything is working together. A too-small rug will actually make a small space feel even smaller!

Next, you want to think about foot traffic. If you’re looking to put a rug in a high foot traffic area, you’ll want to ensure any rug you select will withstand an onslaught of dirt and use.

Finally, when adding a colorful rug to your space you don’t need to “match your decor. You just want to keep everything in the same design family. Do you decorate with mostly warm colors or cooler tones? That will help you pick your colors.



 

If you’re looking to upgrade the coziness of your home before the holidays hit, I definitely think one of these rugs would be a great way to do it. I’m already debating which one I might add to our house. I do have a home office refresh in the works! If I pick out one of these rugs – I’ll be sure to share.

How are you planning on sprucing up your spaces for the holidays?

images c/o beni rugs

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Source: apartment34.com

How to Organize a Small Room with No Closet | ApartmentSearch

Woman sitting on her computer in a room full of boxesWhen you first saw the place, you thought having a room without a closet was “charming.” Now that you’ve unpacked your whole wardrobe and have nowhere to stuff your stuff, it doesn’t seem charming at all! Don’t worry, though — you can have the apartment you dreamed of with just a little creativity and organization. Try these tips for organizing your place with no closet space.

Purge Your Possessions

You knew this one was coming and were probably dreading it, so let’s get it out of the way. Even if you got rid of items before the move, go ahead and “Marie Kondo” your clothes as you unpack. Do the same with smaller décor and knickknacks — too many tchotchkes will just end up cluttering your apartment. If you need more direction on decorating, we’ve got some more tips to avoid decorating mistakes.

B-Y-O-Closet

If your apartment is missing a closet, just bring your own! Find a free-standing wardrobe or clothing rack that’s both sturdy and stylish. One with a hanging rack and shelving is ideal since it can hold anything from button-downs to boots. Just avoid anything too large for your space. Over-the-door shoe racks are great space savers, also — and a must if you can’t bear to part with your favorite pairs of sneakers.

Rotate Seasonal Clothes

You won’t need that down jacket in July, and sandals won’t keep your toes warm mid-winter. In the warmer months, store your tanks, shorts, sandals, and sundresses in the front of your closet space and drawers. When the cold weather rolls in, swap out those clothes for your jeans, sweaters, boots, and jackets. Layers you’ll wear in any season, like tees and cardigans, can stay easily accessible year-round. Move the out-of-season items to hidden storage (like under the bed as mentioned above) to minimize the clutter.

Don’t Let Any Space Go to Waste

Utilize multi-functional furniture and hidden storage. Loft your bed to create space for storage underneath it or purchase a bed frame with built-in drawers. If you want a bench or ottoman for extra seating, look for one that doubles as a trunk. These are great places to keep things you only need every so often, like out-of-season clothes or bed linens. And the right shelving can maximize your storage space while maintaining your apartment’s aesthetic. Vertical and open shelves will keep a small space from feeling smaller but requires good upkeep.

Look for Simple Storage Solutions

Invest in decorative baskets or fabric bins, and plenty of them! Of all the small space storage ideas, these are possibly the easiest and most functional. They can store anything from socks or jewelry to t-shirts or blankets and can sit on a shelf, slide under the bed, or stack (neatly!) in a corner.

Now that you know what to do if you don’t have a closet in your new apartment take your space from small to stunning with high-quality, affordable storage solutions from your nearest furniture outlet. And if your wardrobe is still spilling out, turn to ApartmentSearch to help you find a place with enough square feet for all your stuff!

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Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Moving from New York to DC: 5 Things You Never Thought of | Apartminty

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Moving-from-new-york-to-dc

Guest Post

Moving from New York to DC is a big decision. It may just be a zip along the coast from one city to another, but it is a long-distance move—which always has the potential to be stressful and overwhelming. Luckily, by gaining as much knowledge as possible about where you are moving and what to expect, you can ease some of your moving anxiety and make the best possible moving decisions. 

Whether you are simply thinking about a long-distance move from NYC to DC or have already started packing your home in the Big Apple, here are 5 commonly overlooked things to consider.

1. It’s Not That Expensive

DC is an expensive place to put down some roots. But it has nothing on New York. 

When the topic of moving to DC comes up, many will be quick to tell you how expensive it is to live there—and they certainly aren’t wrong. A one-bedroom apartment in the city center of DC will cost you, on average, $2,350 per month, while buying in the same area will run you around $6,529 per square meter (10.7 sq. feet). 

However, in comparison, renting a one-bedroom apartment in New York’s city center costs $3,275 per month on average. Then there is buying which is over double the price, coming in at $14,946 per square meter (10.7 sq. feet). The verdict? With the cost of rent being around 25% cheaper and buying costing 50% less in DC, you can save a lot of money or finally get that housing upgrade you’ve been dreaming about.

How do food prices compare? Also favorably! Staples like rice, bananas, and potatoes cost approximately 50% less in DC, while onions, eggs, and bottled water are 25% cheaper. 

SOURCE: Numbeo 

 2. Double the Snow

Prices aren’t the only thing that gets doubled in New York—on average, New York gets almost twice as much snow as DC. 

DC may not be the best choice if you are a snowman aficionado or love the look of fresh snow. On average, New York will get around 25.1 inches of snow in a year, while DC boasts only getting a little over a foot, 14.5 inches. However, you will find that the temperature across both states is highly similar. 

SOURCE: Current Results

Pro Tip: If you are thinking about moving in winter, keep in mind that snow can be a hindrance. Bad weather on moving day can be a recipe for disaster with unfavorable road conditions, soggy boxes, and wet shoes. If possible, hold off your move until spring or consider hiring professional movers that are accustomed to dealing with hazardous weather.

3. There’s a Dress Code 

Dust off your formal and business attire if you want to fit in with the DC crowd.

New York is known for its diversity, and that certainly extends to the clothing you see on the streets. However, DC is another story. The influence of the government in DC is very apparent, especially around The Hill, with formal and conservative attire being the norm. It is the unspoken way of the land and if you want to blend in, you should adopt the same style. Nothing will make you stick out more than sore thumb like unprofessional or unkempt attire—it is how you can spot a non-DC native a mile away. 

Have an interview in DC? Opt for a more formal outfit than usual to err on the safe side. Chances are your idea of formal and DC’s differ, so kick it up one notch higher than you normally would. Going for a night out? Upscale bars and places with fine dining in DC may turn you away if your attire isn’t up to par. Be sure to phone ahead of time and ask about dress codes of establishments if you are unsure.

 4. Cleaner Public Transportation

Sitting on DC public transportation might not leave you feeling like you need a hot shower with extra soap. 

It is no secret that NYC subways don’t exactly have the cleanest feel, so you’ll be thrilled to hear that DC’s Metro system is much cleaner. Mind you, there is a bit of a trade-off as it covers less ground and is less efficient. But don’t let that deter you. In conjunction with the subway, DC also has a great bus system, the DC Circulator, which covers most of the city.

Want a more private commute? Those familiar yellow taxis are also available. Alright, they aren’t as yellow, but their fares are comparable to NYC.

 5. Taxes are Different

DC sales tax is lower than New York’s, but there are a few other taxes to consider.  

With New York’s sales tax averaging 8%, DC’s is a bit lower at 5.75%. Plus, medication, groceries, and utilities are exempt. The downside? Liquor, car rentals, and restaurant bills are taxed at 10%. While parking will charge you 19% and hotels will tax 14.8%.   

Flipping back to the positive side of DC taxes, did you know if you are an individual making 50% or 60% of the area median income (AMI), you may qualify for a tax credit apartment? Also known as workforce housing. Finding a tax credit apartment in DC can make living much more affordable, so it is worth looking into if you think you qualify. 

DC is filled with a rich history and many opportunities, so don’t let its differences from New York deter your move. If you are considering a move to DC or are about to embark on one if you do your research, make a moving checklist, and plan ahead, you can make sure your move is a huge success. Before you know it, you’ll be settled into your new home! Will you start cheering for the Washington Nationals instead of the Mets? Well, that’s a whole other story.

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Source: blog.apartminty.com

The Safest Place in Your Apartment During a Tornado

Tornadoes are no joke. With winds that can top 250 miles per hour, these storms can clear a path a mile wide and 50 miles long. Emerging from afternoon thunderstorms, tornadoes usually include hail and high winds. This is why you need to take cover when the warning siren goes off.

The average alert time for a tornado is 13 minutes, but there are environmental clues one is on its way. The sky transforms into a dark, greenish mass and begins to roar like an oncoming train.

Tornadoes can happen anywhere

Tornadoes occur all over the world, but, “In terms of absolute tornado counts, the United States leads the list, with an average of over 1,000 tornadoes recorded each year,” according to the National Centers for Environmental Information.

The U.S. experiences tornadoes all over the country, but one particular area gets hit the hardest. Known as Tornado Alley, the area covers South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Northern Texas and Eastern Colorado.

tornado alley maptornado alley map

Source: Accuweather

Whether you live in an area where tornadoes are common or not, it’s important to know how to stay safe in your apartment. Just as you create a plan for many emergency situations, know where to go in your apartment during these destructive storms.

Staying safe in an apartment building

On average, tornadoes move at speeds of about 10-20 miles per hour. They rarely travel more than six miles, which means they can damage a whole section of town. For that reason, if a tornado is in your area, seek shelter.

Basement

While basements are not an option in all apartment buildings, get low if you can during a tornado. Heading to the basement or even the sub-level of a parking garage offers the most insulation against the weather.

If your building doesn’t have a basement, try to get to the lowest floor if you can, regardless of whether or not it’s underground.

Interior rooms

The next safest option during a tornado is any area fully-inside the building. This means no outside walls. Under a stairwell, an interior hallway or even a room within your apartment can work. Make sure there are no windows.

Crouch down as low as you can get with your face down. Cover your head with your hands for extra protection or bring in a bike helmet to wear during the storm. Because of your location, there’s still a chance for debris to fall, so protecting your head is important.

Bathroom

Even if they have an exterior wall or windows, bathrooms are safe because the thick pipes inside the walls insulate you during a tornado. Climb into the bathtub if you have one and bring in your bed’s mattress to serve as a cover.

Closet

These are usually interior rooms by design, making closets a good choice to ride out a tornado. Pull your clothes off their hangers and grab any bedding from the shelves to insulate yourself. Don’t forget to close the closet door for even more protection.

tornadotornado

Avoid dangerous areas

Tornadoes kill about 80 people each year, according to John Roach at AccuWeather. There was a decrease in tornado fatalities in 2018, with only 10 Americans dying. This is the lowest number since record-keeping started in 1875.

Yet, people still lose their lives to these dangerous storms. While knowing the safest places to be in your apartment during a tornado, you should also know what areas to avoid.

Windows

With gusting winds strong enough to shatter glass, windows become dangerous during a tornado. Even worse, once a window breaks, all kinds of debris can blow inside.

If you can’t stay completely clear from windows during a tornado, do your best to block them and protect yourself. If you can, duct tape a blanket over the window or slide a big piece of furniture in front to keep glass out of your apartment.

Heavy objects

While it may seem like a good idea to slide under your bed or inch behind a heavy dresser for protection during a tornado, it’s not. These pieces of furniture can shift during a storm or even fall through the floor. You don’t want to get pinned under or against something so heavy you can’t move.

Preparing for a tornado

If you live in an area where tornado warnings are common, consider creating a tornado evacuation kit to have on hand. These can include items you’d need to safely and easily exit your apartment after a tornado passes, such as:

  • Portable radio
  • Flashlight
  • Extra batteries
  • Cell phone charger
  • Bottled water
  • Spare set of car and apartment keys
  • Photocopy of your driver’s license
  • Cash

Having these items ready can make it easier to evacuate your building after the storm.

Remaining safe after the tornado passes

Being safe doesn’t stop once a tornado passes. Dealing with the aftermath of this type of storm includes new dangers. Make sure to watch out for fallen or exposed utility lines, downed trees or limbs and debris.

Exercise extreme caution when leaving your apartment building. If enough damage occurs, you may have to stay out of your apartment. You may not see the dangers, so it’s important to wait for an official word before reentering. When you can, take pictures of any damage to your own property since you’ll most likely have to file an insurance claim.

Preparing for the unexpected such as weather, fire or even flood means having the right supplies and the best information on how to stay safe.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

ADA Compliance: What Renters Need to Know

You may dream of owning your home or place of business, but renting is more affordable. Plenty of other people are in the same position, so this is a booming business. Part of a landlord’s responsibilities is creating a usable space for all tenants, which means complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

What is the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)?

The ADA became law in 1990 to protect both tenants and renters in cases that could involve disability discrimination. Before you sign your next lease for your home or business, check out what every tenant should know about ADA compliance. Renters are responsible for more than you might think, so it’s essential to fully understand what you’re walking into.

woman in wheelchair

1. Both parties are responsible

People with disabilities are protected by the ADA, specifically when it comes to Title III. This requires landlords to make rental spaces accessible for anyone with a disability so they can access the property equally. They must modify their properties to meet current ADA regulations, which was last updated in 2010.

In the case of renting a commercial or residential unit, both parties are responsible for ensuring they meet ADA requirements. Before signing on the dotted line, discuss any needed additions or renovations and who’s responsible for paying for them. It’s supposed to be a team effort, which can result in liability exposure for the landlord if they don’t comply.

2. Auxiliary aids are included

Hearing and vision impairments sometimes get overlooked during building construction, but they’re part of Title III. Depending on the agreement with your landlord, they may cover most or half of the bill for aids like notetakers, Braille additions or signs in larger print.

3. Accessibility modifications may count

Your landlord may try to fight against paying for accessibility modifications if they want to cut corners. Still, they must pay the full bill if the changes count as reasonable modifications, like installing a ramp to get into the unit. Vertical lifts and elevators may also join the accessibility options list, depending on the renter’s disability.

Reasonable modifications are mostly defined by how inexpensive and quick the projects are, but the landlord should pay the total bill if they haven’t provided an accessible property.

braille elevator buttons

4. Both parties designate responsibility

Most commercial leases leave room for tenants and landlords to allocate responsibility before they become official. Depending on the tenant’s financial capabilities, the two parties will decide what they’ll pay for regarding unmet ADA compliance. The finer details, if any, will vary depending on the lease.

Even after both parties agree on their responsibilities, tenants may have to go a step further. Read through your lease to see if there’s language indicating you need to provide your landlord with a lawyer if they’re the subject of an ADA lawsuit. They’ll still legally have to meet their agreed-upon responsibilities, but tenants could have to pay for their legal representation if it’s outlined in the lease.

5. Landlords deal with common areas

Even though your rental space may be ADA compliant, the areas surrounding it could be challenging to access. Because spaces like sidewalks and parking lots aren’t included in your lease, landlords are responsible for them.

If you have any issues accessing your rental unit because these areas don’t have the disability modifications you need, your landlord should fix them at no cost to you.

6. Injunctive relief is common

Some renters may seek financial compensation for their time or efforts in dealing with inaccessible spaces, but most of the time, that’s not possible. The majority of states won’t allow plaintiffs to receive monetary damages or compensation under Title III. Still, you may be responsible for attorney fees and costs after the case gets settled in court. The majority of cases end with injunctive relief, where one or both parties work to solve the issues at hand.

The only time plaintiffs might get damages at the end of a case is if the U.S. Attorney General files an action based on a pattern of discrimination on the part of the landlord. The fines then may include financial compensation or back pay as needed.

Get everything in writing

Both tenants and landlords should get everything in writing as they work to come to an agreement about who’s responsible for which ADA compliance issues. If something goes wrong in the future and one party files a complaint in court, documented terms and signed paperwork will help sort through the problem and come to the best solution for everyone.

The post ADA Compliance: What Renters Need to Know appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

How to Kill Bathroom Mold: 8 Methods to Try

So, it’s happened. You’re in the shower and you spot it — mold. What do you do now? It’s tricky to know how to kill mold in a safe way and make sure it doesn’t come back. Luckily, there are several ways to ensure your apartment is clean and mold-free. Here are multiple ways you can kill mold.

Understanding what causes mold

Before you can kill the mold in your apartment, you have to know what caused it. Mold can occur in a couple of different ways:

  • Lack of or poor ventilation that causes moisture to linger in the air
  • Faulty plumbing like leaking sinks, faucets or drains
  • Damp materials like rugs, towels, wallpaper, grout or drywall that never completely dry

These are the most common ways mold forms in your apartment. Now that you understand the different ways mold can grow, you can identify what caused the mold in your apartment and choose the best tip to prevent and kill it.

How to kill mold in your apartment

It’s recommended that if the affected, moldy area is larger than 10 feet or if you notice mold is growing in your apartment’s insulation, you should call a professional. However, if it’s a small area and the mold is already there, you need to get rid of it.

Here are some mold-prevention tips to make sure mold never inhabits your apartment and living space again.

1. Use or install a bathroom fan

bathroom fanbathroom fan

Use the bathroom’s ventilation fan while you bathe and leave it on for 30 minutes after you get out. If you don’t have a ventilation fan, think about installing one. The fan can help suck the moisture out of the air so it doesn’t linger and lead to a mold infestation.

Another tip on how to kill mold is to keep down the humidity in your home. Fans and dehumidifiers can help improve ventilation in the space, therefore reducing moisture that can cause mold.

2. Organize your bathroom products

shampoo bottlesshampoo bottles

Yes, organization can actually help keep your space safe and mold-free.

When you leave things like shampoo, body soap and bath toys on the side of the shower without ever removing them, water gets stuck underneath allowing mold to grow. By frequently adjusting their placement and cleaning underneath them weekly, you can reduce the risk of mold growth in your bathroom.

3. Apply tea tree oil

tea treetea tree

Not only does tea tree oil have a nice smell, but it’s also a great way to get rid of and kill bathroom mold. Simply mix one teaspoon of oil and one cup of water. You can either pour the mixed solution into a spray bottle or pour it into a bowl and dip your scrubber into it. Scrub the moldy area with the mix to remove the mold.

Once the area has been cleaned don’t rinse it with water as it’s best to let the mixture sit to prevent future mold from growing. Note, when buying tea tree oil for mold removal, make sure it contains melaleuca alternifolia in the ingredients.

4. Clean with vinegar

vinegarvinegar

Vinegar is an effective, non-toxic way to get rid of mold. If you go with this method, here’s how to use it. Pour white vinegar into a spray bottle and make sure to not dilute it with water. Spray the affected area with the vinegar and let it sit for one hour.

If you have windows in the area you’re cleaning, it’s best to leave them open for ventilation. After an hour, use hot water to wipe the area clean. Finally, dry it off completely as mold thrives in damp places.

5. Use baking soda

baking sodabaking soda

Baking soda is another option if vinegar isn’t for you. Not only does it kill mold but it absorbs moisture. This is a great option if you have pets as it isn’t harmful to animals.

Mix a quarter of a tablespoon into the water and pour it into a spray bottle. Spray the area and scrub the mold away, then rinse the area with hot water. Finally, you can spray the area again and let it dry to prevent future mold.

6. Sanitize with bleach

cleaning with bleachcleaning with bleach

Bleach is a good way to get rid of mold on nonporous surfaces, however, it’s not recommended to use bleach on surfaces such as wood. Make sure when using bleach that you take all the safety precautions, such as wearing gloves and having proper ventilation. Remember to never mix bleach with any other cleaning solution as it can cause toxic fumes.

The most effective way to use bleach to kill mold is to mix one cup of bleach with a gallon of water. Spray it onto the affected area, let it soak and scrub that nasty mold away. When you’re done, rinse the area down and dry it completely.

7. Scrub with borax

scrubbing with boraxscrubbing with borax

Borax can be found at most grocery stores in the laundry detergent aisle and is a great option to get rid of and kill most molds in your bathroom. Mold Help for You has a great recipe for a borax solution to kill mold that’s easy-to-make and effective.

8. Clean using hydrogen peroxide

hydrogen peroxidehydrogen peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide is easy to find and easy to use to kill mold. All you have to do is spray the area with it and let it sit for 10 minutes, then scrub the area and rinse with hot water.

Getting rid of mold for good

Mold is never a welcome guest in your home or bathroom. But with these cleaning solutions and tips on how to kill bathroom mold, you’ll be prepared and ready to attack and kill next time it strikes.

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Source: apartmentguide.com